"Houston, we have problems!" Where did the phrase become winged?

A dry statement of fact - a message to Houston about the existence of problems became a common tirade, implying and expressing a huge range of diverse feelings and emotions: from despair to irony. In fact, few compatriots know for sure where the phrase came from: “Houston, we have problems!”

Unverified information

Finding out where the phrase: “Houston, we have problems!”, Should take into account one of the conventional versions that claim that the popular expression heard the audience long before the actual events and rental of the brainchild of Ron Howard.

Houston we have a problem where the phrase comes from

As many authoritative sources say, for the first time, the hero of the fantastic movie Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964), directed by Byron Haskin, referred to the unknown at that time to everyone except the Americans. Of course, for the curious spectator, who, in order to find out where the phrase “Houston, we have problems!” From, will risk seeing the picture, it will be difficult to take it seriously.For more than half a century, the picture is noticeably outdated, and is now similar to a children's fairy tale. The tape plot is based on Defoe's immortal novel, the action is moved from a desert island to a red planet. After the crash of the spacecraft, his captain Draper with limited supplies of food and water is on the surface of Mars. At first it seems that he has no chance to survive, but events are developing in unpredictable ways. But at the same time, there are two alternative and documented versions explaining where the phrase: “Houston, we have problems!” Appeared.

Houston we have problems from where the phrase film

Real events

The second theory relates to the dramatic events of 1970 that occurred on the Apollo-13 manned space shuttle. This, which later became a popular expression, was uttered by astronaut John Swigert. On April 11, 1970, the crew of the spacecraft, according to the flight plan, went into orbit. Just a few days later there was a breakdown, as a result of which the ship lost a source of electricity and a certain amount of water. According to the protocol, the members of the space expedition were to report on unforeseen circumstances on Earth, namely to the Houston Space Center. The only difference in the report of John Suiger from the common expression was time.In reality, the notification sounded like "Houston, we had a problem," that is, in the past tense, indicating the elimination of difficulties. Why the past has changed to the present and where the phrase: "Houston, we have a problem" occurred, will be described below. But thanks to the elimination of the consequences of the accident and the return to the earth of the spacecraft technology, NASA were able to identify technical shortcomings in the design, and the astronaut's speech came into use by the masses around the world.

where did the phrase come from houston we have problems

Cosmic drama

The film directed by Ron Howard "Apollo 13" (1995) has an eloquent slogan consisting of the phrase: "Houston, we have problems!" How did this expression appear in the film, only his scriptwriters W. Broyles, Jr. Reinert and D. Lovell. In the story, it is said by the hero Jim Lovell, whose role was brilliantly played by the charismatic Tom Hanks. After the premiere of films by the audience around the world, it became clear that Houston is not only not a specific person (and not even Whitney Houston, addressed to a lot of jokes about this topic), but the NASA space center controlling flights. By the way, the dictum, which originally meant serious difficulties, was often used by cinematographers in their works, for example, in Armageddon (1998).

Currently, NASA has opened access to its online library of audio files, where anyone can listen and download all the famous phrases of astronauts, including the one that this publication is dedicated to.

Related news

Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged image, picture, imagery


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 25


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 10


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 17


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 90


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 94


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 66


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 67


Houston, we have problems. Where the phrase has become winged 59